Charles Sturt University
Charles Sturt University

Indigenous Community Partnerships

The Centre for Law and Justice works closely with the Bathurst Wiradyuri and Aboriginal Community Elders on the embedding of Indigenous perspectives in law and criminology curriculum. The Centre engages the Elders as consultants on curriculum and teaching and learning strategies. We respect the place of the Elders as the guardians of Indigenous knowledges and our relationship builds collaboration between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander staff, students and communities. Embedding place-based knowledges and different ways of knowing is globally recognised as an effective pedagogy in higher education learning. This form of learning highlights personal narratives of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples of the impact of historical and contemporary policies and acknowledges the richness of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander knowledges and ways of knowing as significant inclusion for academic thought to build social tolerance. It ensures students build their knowledge of the diversity, strength and resilience of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures, histories and communities.

Wirdayuri (or Wiradjuri) Elder Uncle Bill, Centre for Law and Justice staff and Guest Lecturer, barrister Claire O’Connor (centre) at the 2017 Law Residential School, Bathurst.

Aunty Joyleen and Ray Rogers, with Aunty Gloria Rogers, delivering the Warming to Country at the 2016 launch of the Centre for Law and Justice.


Wirdayuri (or Wiradjuri) Elder Dinawan Dyirribang – Uncle Bill Allen and Wirdayuri (or Wiradjuri) Elder in Training Yanhadarrambal Flynn deliver the Welcome to Country.

Wirdayuri (or Wiradjuri) Elder in Training Yanhadarrambal Flynn delivers the Welcome to Country.